Texture Studies

NAVASOTA, Texas – So much, so close. Pausing to experience the world one square foot at a time changes outlooks and attitudes. When we think about it, everything is everywhere.

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An Eventful October

NAVASOTA, Texas – Road trip! Make plans to visit the Brazos Valley this October.

For a full list of upcoming events, see www.acbv.org/events

A new mobile darkroom meets the road

NAVASOTA, Texas – It worked. Made from a collapsible pet kennel, I drove the new portable darkroom to a secluded country road to make a test image. I am working with paper negatives. It took about twenty minutes to set up and breakdown. It was scorching hot inside. However, I’m excited. This brings me one crucial step closer to crafting tintypes and ambrotypes anywhere. Maybe a tour of Grimes County or the entire Brazos Valley will happen next. We’ll have to wait and see.

Railroad Trestle

NAVASOTA, Texas – Find a bridge. My folks and I left Austin to photograph the countryside of East Texas in November 2014. However, traffic jammed the road at Bastrop. We discussed turning back, decided to keep going, and reached Navasota at last light. While admiring the P.A. Smith Hotel during the golden hour, a friendly lady said hello. “If you’re looking for something to photograph, there’s a beautiful railroad bridge located to the north.” We drove in circles trying to find it and came away empty. However, I returned in 2017.

Navasota Responds When Tragedy Strikes

NAVASOTA – As Hurricane Harvey landed on the Texas Coast, we gathered essentials, moved the gallery’s open sign inside and watched the news. Outside of the Horlock House, rain fell for three days. The corner grocer sold out of milk and bread. The Navasota river flooded, and the Brazos breached at Highway 105. However, we emerged unharmed.

Navasota has a big heart. Residents donated supplies, took boats to Houston and restored my faith in neighbors helping strangers. During the storm, surrounded by half-submerged houses at night, News Channel Two filmed an Anderson man pushing a boat to rescue stranded Houstonians. When asked why, he said, “I just want to help; it’s the right thing.”